YOU ARE AT:Archived ArticlesSYNAR WILL LEAD WRC DELEGATION PURSUING MORE MSS SPECTRUM

SYNAR WILL LEAD WRC DELEGATION PURSUING MORE MSS SPECTRUM

WASHINGTON-The United States will seek additional spectrum for voice and data low-earth-orbit global satellite systems at the World Radiocommunication Conference this fall in Geneva.

“We’ve worked closely with the private sector to achieve what we believe will provide our industry and this country with the spectrum it needs to be in the unique position as the premier provider of satellite technology around the world, while creating millions of high-wage jobs here at home,” said Mike Synar, head of the 40-member U.S. delegation and a former Democratic congressman from Oklahoma who was defeated in last fall’s midterm election.

The conference, scheduled for Oct. 23-Nov. 17, is held under the auspices of the International Telecommunication Union. The State Department, which formulates international telecommunications policy, developed WRC-95 positions with input from the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and the Federal Communications Commission.

U.S. officials will attempt to shore up support for their proposals prior to the WRC-95 in bilateral talks with various nations in coming months. Specifically, the United States will seek more feeder link frequencies for so-called big LEO satellite systems licensed to operate above 1 GHz.

The FCC early this year granted permits to Motorola Inc., TRW Inc. and Loral-Qualcomm L.P. to build global pocket phone satellite systems and is considering applications from several other firms.

An additional six megahertz will be sought for little LEO systems that operate below 1 GHz, like that licensed to Orbital Communications Corp., which will provide data communications to handheld receivers on a global basis. Other little LEO systems will be licensed by the FCC later.

An effort also will be made to make 2 GHz allocations more flexible internationally to accommodate mobile satellite systems.

“The proposals will enable the development of new global communications satellite systems that promise profound developmental and economic benefits to the world,” said Susan Ness, an FCC commissioner closely involved with WRC-95.

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