FreedomPop launches data-free plan for less than $5 per month

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No-contract wireless mobile virtual network operator FreedomPop rolled out a new rate-plan offering that provides unlimited voice and text messaging for less than $5 per month.

The company, which offers service running across Sprint’s cellular network, unveiled the new plan that forgoes data for $4.58 per month. The offer will run alongside its other smartphone-centric plans that include 200 voice minutes, 500 texts and 500 megabytes of data for free, or unlimited voice, messaging and 500 MB of data for $11 per month plan.

FreedomPop noted that since it rolled out the smartphone plans last year October, it has signed up approximately 500,000 “users to its beta invite list,” not to be confused with actually attracting new users. Looking to further its attractiveness, FreedomPop said it has added the Samsung Galaxy S2 smartphone to its portfolio, which the company is selling for $169 without a contract. The Galaxy S2 joins the previously offered HTC Evo Design that launched for $99 without a contract.

freedompop logo

Both devices are a few generations old, but FreedomPop noted that such models allow the company to offer feature-packed smartphones for a low price without a subsidy. Those devices are compatible with Sprint’s CDMA-based 3G and legacy WiMAX network, though FreedomPop noted that it plans to add LTE-compatible devices later this year.

“We’re working hard to add high quality devices to meet the growing demand from new users. The Samsung Galaxy II is our most advanced device to date and we plan to add even more high-end options in the weeks to come,” explained FreedomPop CEO Stephen Stokols.

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Dan Meyer

Editor-in-Chief, Telecom Software, Policy, Wireless Carriers
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Dan Meyer started at RCR Wireless News in 1999 covering wireless carriers and wireless technologies. As editor-in-chief, Dan oversees editorial direction, reports on news from the wireless industry, including telecom software, policy and wireless carriers, and provides opinion stories on topics of concern to the market such as his popular Friday column “Worst of the Week.”

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