YOU ARE AT:Archived ArticlesYoung, low-wage earners are most likely wireless-only users

Young, low-wage earners are most likely wireless-only users

Twenty-somethings are most likely to give up their landline phones in favor of wireless-only service, and the trend is growing, according to analysis by Integras, a division of Claritas Inc.

Integras studied a group of wireless phone users who did not have local, landline service providers, including those who had never had local phone service and those who cancelled it after signing up for wireless service. Study results from 2001 and 2003 were compared to determine changes in usage and emerging trends.

According to Integras, young adults were more likely to be wireless-only subscribers in both years, with consumers under 30 years old two times more likely to be wireless-only in 2001, and three and a half times more likely in 2003.

In addition, the average age range for those more likely to have wireless-only service dropped from 2001 to 2003. In 2001, those more likely than average to have wireless-only service were below 54 years old. By 2003, only those under 35 were more likely than average to be wireless-only users.

Finally, those earning less than $40,000 per year in 2003, and particularly those earning less than $10,000 per year, dominated wireless-only users. In 2001, high-income earners were more likely to test wireless-only service, with people earning more than $200,000 per year being the second most likely to be wireless-only customers. By 2003, this group was the least likely to be wireless-only customers.

Finally, according to Integras, renters are more likely than homeowners to be wireless-only customers.

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