RCR Wireless Logo

Master LTE with the Help of an LTE Network Diagram

Long Term Evolution (LTE) is a complex technology, and most of could use a hand understanding it. This can be helped with LTE Network Diagrams. But first, we need to establish a general definition of this new, vivacious network and its architecture. In order to provide today’s users with that fast connections, LTE  relies on radio access and employs non-radio aspects with System Architecture Evolution (SAE), which includes the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) network. In Alcatel Lucent’s strategic white paper The LTE Network Architecture: A comprehensive tutorial, authors Sudeep Palat and Phillip Godin explain how together, LTE and SEA comprise the EPS.

www.netscout.com

www.netscout.com

LTE Architecture Overview

EPS relies heavily on bearers. The EPS uses these bearers to route IP traffic from a gateway in the pocket data network (PDN) to the user equipment (UE). A bearer is an IP packet flow with a defined quality of service (QoS) between the gateway and the UE. These bearers allow Internet access. They also run services such as Voice over IP (VoIP), and are often associated with a QoS.

“Multiple bearers can be established for a user in order to provide different QoS streams or connectivity to different PDNs. For example, a user might be engaged in a VoIP call while at the same time performing web browsing or FTP download.” To protect the network, the EPS network utilized its elements that have different roles.

LTE SAE

Photo: Interphase Networks

The Core Network

Overall control of the UE within the LTE architecture is handled by the core network. The core network (also known as EPC in SAE) is also responsible for establishing the bearers.

The main components of the EPC are:

• PDN Gateway (P-GW)

• Serving Gateway (S-GW)

• Mobility Management Entity (MME)

Other functions and nodes within the EPC include the Home Subscriber Server (HSS) and the Policy Control and Charging Rules Function (PCRF). “Since the EPS only provides a bearer path of a certain QoS, control of multimedia applications such as VoIP is provided by the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), which is considered to be outside the EPS itself.” To dive even deeper  into the LTE architecture playing field and to gain a more technical understanding, take a look at these LTE architecture diagrams.

The Access Network

Leave it to LTE to function with not only a core network, but also an access network. The access network of LTE, known as E-UTRAN, consists of a network of eNodeBs. For normal user traffic, there is no centralized controller in E-UTRAN; therfore the E-UTRAN architecture is considered flat. According to Alcatel-Lucent, the eNodeBs are interconnected with each other by an interface known as “X2” and to the EPC by the S1 interface — more specifically, to the MME by the S1-MME interface and to the S-GW by the S1-U interface.

www.mobilitytechzone.com

www.mobilitytechzone.com

To get an even broader perspective, take a look at a collection of LTE Network Diagrams, all with a slightly different aesthetic.

www.iphase.com

www.iphase.com

wirelesstech.info

wirelesstech.info